<br /> Is /usr/sbin really the proper place for traceroute? – Debian Planet

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    Is /usr/sbin really the proper place for traceroute?
    Submitted by ressu on Thursday, June 14, 2001 – 15:20
    Once again the debate on moving some useful software from
    /usr/sbin to /usr/bin, and once again the same arguments come
    up. Whether to allow some breakage and move the software that
    users mostly use from /usr/sbin to /usr/bin.

    Interesting enough, there are a few programs in /usr/sbin
    that get invoked almost daily by a normal user, and still they
    are kept in /usr/sbin. One of these programs is traceroute
    which brought up the discussion this time, this time it was the
    maintainer of traceroute-nanog that wanted to know the general
    opinion, and as before failed to get a clear view of users
    opinions.

    Here is a small summary of the discussion
    The whole discussion can be found either at lists.debian.org or from Google

    thread 1
    and
    thread 2

    Ben Gertzfield quoted the following from FHS v2.2


    4.10 /usr/sbin: Non-essential standard system binaries
    4.10.1 Purpose

    This directory contains any non-essential binaries used exclusively by
    the system administrator. System administration programs that are
    required for system repair, system recovery, mounting /usr, or other
    essential functions must be placed in /sbin instead.

    The biggest point for against are:

    • traceroute must stay in /usr/sbin because moving it will
      break local scripts that depend on it being exactly where it
      has been for the last 5+ years.
    • To adhere to FHS, almost everything in /sbin,/usr/sbin
      will have to be moved out: ifconfig, sendmail, route,
      etc.

    Any single good reasons were not mentioned, although it
    makes perfect sense (at least to me) to move the file from sbin
    to bin. I think this comment covers pretty much of
    opinions:


    The useful purpose is fixing a FHS non-compliance bug. Or the
    purpose is making the system more usable for users.

    The fact that other packages have had to exhibit breakage to
    "work around" this packages breakage, is hardly a glowing
    recommendation to keep things broken.

    -- Vince Mulhollon

    Personally i feel that suggesting things like adding
    /usr/sbin to your $PATH is kind of weird answer coming from
    people who try to make everything work like they are supposed
    to. Adding sbin to path is not a solution it’s a workaround for
    an OLD bug. Personally i don’t like workarounds if the original
    bug can be fixed, why not fix it and get the long term gain
    from it.

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    Subject: Re: Is /usr/sbin really the proper place for traceroute?
    Author: steelhawk
    Date: Friday, 2001/06/15 – 12:15
    I don’t really see why ping and traceroute are in so different dirs

    ping is in /bin (“needed during boot, normal user app”)
    traceroute is in /usr/sbin (“not needed during boot, superuser app”)

    And still… my use of traceroute is usually to see where something goes wrong if ping fails… why is then one considered to be needed before everything is mounted (possibly over nfs/similar) and the other not?

    [ return ]

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